Throw everything on the table! Culinary addictions of three outstanding Russian gourmets

Yes, this time "Kitchen of the Motherland" allowed itself to look into the plates of the most inveterate Russian gourmets, so that the reader marveled and licked his lips. Modern nutritionists would be horrified by their culinary addictions. But their love for a delicious and plentiful table did not prevent them from remaining popular, successful and talented.

V. Mullin. The merchants are walking. 2015 year.

Millionaire Ivan Chizhov: Sour cabbage soup in champagne bottles

This is what the millionaire and famous hedonist Ivan Vasilyevich Chizhov thought about proper nutrition: "I don't have these different fools-joli and fricasse-kurasa. We eat in Russian - but the belly does not hurt, according to doctors we rush about, we do not stagger abroad. " By the way, Ivan Vasilyevich lived to a ripe old age and in good health.

His daily menu could have inspired François Rabelais to write the second part of his famous novel. So, this is what was usually on the table of Russian Gargantua: cold beluga, sturgeon with horseradish, caviar, crayfish soup, fish or kidney villager with two pies, roast pig, veal or fish - according to the season. In the summer, he was sure to treat himself to botvinia with sturgeon, white fish and dry grated balyk. For dessert, Ivan Vasilyevich preferred Guryev's porridge, a portion of which was the size of a frying pan. Sometimes, for a change, the pies were replaced by the Baydak pie - a huge kulebyaka stuffed with twelve layers. There was everything: from burbot liver to bone marrow in oil. Chizhov washed down this gastronomic abundance of red and white wine.

V. Makovsky. In the tavern. 1887 year.

He usually dined at the Merchants' Club, where he ate a creamy turkey fed with walnuts for the whole evening in a large company and washed it down with icy champagne. And although all kinds of alcohol flowed like a river, the club was famous for kvass and fruit waters. Sour cabbage soup was considered a special drink - the best remedy for a hangover. Yes, yes, it was exactly a drink, very similar to kvass, only with the addition of raisins and much more carbonated. Sour cabbage soup in the Merchant Club was poured into champagne bottles.

The fabulist Ivan Krylov: Oysters are not less than eighty, but not more than a hundred

Ivan Andreevich Krylov possessed not only colossal talent, but also an excellent appetite. The fabulist was a fan of the hearty and simple Russian dinner. As his contemporary, poet and translator Mikhail Lobanov recalled, most of all Krylov loved "good cabbage soup, kulebyaka, fat pies, a goose with milk mushrooms, whitefish with eggs and a pig with horseradish. Oysters sometimes tempted his stomach, and he destroyed at least eighty of them, but no more than a hundred. "

Krylov led a bachelor lifestyle, the cook cooked him very badly, so he regularly dined with friends, in clubs and royal residences, since everyone loved the writer and considered it an honor to properly feed him. This, however, was not easy. Each dish he put on his plate as much as fit, and was always glad to have an addition. If the owner knew that Krylov was invited to dinner, they would definitely prepare an additional dish. But even an extra portion could not calm the exorbitant appetite of the "St. Petersburg La Fontaine".

There is a known case when Krylov was invited "for pasta" by Count Vladimir Musin-Pushkin. The writer was late, and for this the count came up with the idea of ​​"punishing" the guilty guest with an extra portion of the main dish of the evening - in a deep plate there were such quantities of pasta that they "were already crawling from the top." Krylov ate it without batting an eye. And then he confessed to the bewildered count: "What will happen to me! I am even now ready to be guilty".

Only extraordinary circumstances could have forced Ivan Andreevich to refuse an invitation to dinner. Once Krylov missed dinner at the Pavlovsk Palace with Empress Maria Feodorovna because he was bitten on the cheek by a wasp. He sent a comic letter to the palace:

Krylov sends bows from his cell,

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Yes, this time the "Kitchen of the Motherland" allowed itself to look into the plates of the most inveterate Russian gourmets, so that the reader marveled and licked his lips. Modern nutritionists would be horrified by their culinary addictions. But their love for a delicious and plentiful table did not prevent them from remaining popular, successful and talented.

V. Mullin. The merchants are walking. 2015 year.

Millionaire Ivan Chizhov: Sour cabbage soup in champagne bottles

This is what the millionaire and famous hedonist Ivan Vasilyevich Chizhov thought about proper nutrition: "I don't have these different fools-joli and fricasse-kurasa. We eat in Russian - but the belly does not hurt, according to doctors we rush about, we do not stagger abroad. " By the way, Ivan Vasilyevich lived to a ripe old age and in good health.

His daily menu could have inspired François Rabelais to write the second part of his famous novel. So, this is what was usually on the table of Russian Gargantua: cold beluga, sturgeon with horseradish, caviar, crayfish soup, fish or kidney villager with two pies, roast pig, veal or fish - according to the season. In the summer, he was sure to treat himself to botvinia with sturgeon, white fish and dry grated balyk. For dessert, Ivan Vasilyevich preferred Guryev's porridge, a portion of which was the size of a frying pan. Sometimes, for a change, the pies were replaced by the Baydak pie - a huge kulebyaka stuffed with twelve layers. There was everything: from burbot liver to bone marrow in oil. Chizhov washed down this gastronomic abundance of red and white wine.

V. Makovsky. In the tavern. 1887 year.

He usually dined at the Merchants' Club, where he ate a creamy turkey fed with walnuts for the whole evening in a large company and washed it down with icy champagne. And although all kinds of alcohol flowed like a river, the club was famous for kvass and fruit waters. Sour cabbage soup was considered a special drink - the best remedy for a hangover. Yes, yes, it was exactly a drink, very similar to kvass, only with the addition of raisins and much more carbonated. Sour cabbage soup in the Merchant Club was poured into champagne bottles.

The fabulist Ivan Krylov: Oysters are not less than eighty, but not more than a hundred

Ivan Andreevich Krylov possessed not only colossal talent, but also an excellent appetite. The fabulist was a fan of the hearty and simple Russian dinner. As his contemporary, poet and translator Mikhail Lobanov recalled, most of all Krylov loved "good cabbage soup, kulebyaka, fat pies, a goose with milk mushrooms, whitefish with eggs and a pig with horseradish. Oysters sometimes tempted his stomach, and he destroyed at least eighty of them, but no more than a hundred. "

Krylov led a bachelor lifestyle, the cook cooked him very badly, so he regularly dined with friends, in clubs and royal residences, since everyone loved the writer and considered it an honor to properly feed him. This, however, was not easy. Each dish he put on his plate as much as fit, and was always glad to have an addition. If the owner knew that Krylov was invited to dinner, they would definitely prepare an additional dish. But even an extra portion could not calm the exorbitant appetite of the "St. Petersburg La Fontaine".

There is a known case when Krylov was invited "for pasta" by Count Vladimir Musin-Pushkin. The writer was late, and for this the count came up with the idea of ​​"punishing" the guilty guest with an extra portion of the main dish of the evening - in a deep plate there were such quantities of pasta that they "were already crawling from the top." Krylov ate it without batting an eye. And then he confessed to the bewildered count: "What will happen to me! I am even now ready to be guilty".

Only extraordinary circumstances could have forced Ivan Andreevich to refuse an invitation to dinner. Once Krylov missed dinner at the Pavlovsk Palace with Empress Maria Feodorovna because he was bitten on the cheek by a wasp. He sent a comic letter to the palace: